As a prospective birth mother, you want to make the best choice for your baby’s future. But it can be tough to do that when you’re worried about the here and now, and bills just keep piling up. If you’re facing this tough situation, you may keep wondering, “If I give my baby up for adoption, would I get paid?”

There are some important things to clarify about the amount of financial assistance that you’ll receive for your adoption. But, before we get into those details, you’ll be happy to know that adoption is 100 percent free for a prospective birth mother like you.  An unplanned pregnancy can quickly become a financial burden so, if you choose this path, you won’t have to worry about paying for adoption‐related services on top of everything else in your life.

If you are wondering, “Does the birth mother get paid for adoption?” there are a few things you should know first. Here are some frequent questions that prospective birth mothers like you have about the financial side of adoption — and the answers that you’re looking for.

If I Give My Baby Up for Adoption, Would I Get Paid?

Expectant mothers do not “get paid” for adoption. It’s better to think of the help you’ll receive as adoption financial assistance, not as “compensation” for placing a baby for adoption.

During your pregnancy, you’ll be put under intense emotional and physical stress. Most, if not all, adoption agencies can help you out by providing adoption financial assistance throughout your pregnancy to make your adoption process a little easier.

That’s not to say that there are adoption agencies that “pay you” for the adoption. On the contrary, there are no adoption agencies that “pay you” for your baby in the United States — only ones that provide financial assistance. It is always illegal to receive payment in exchange for your child.

So, while you won’t necessarily get paid, if you’re considering adoption, “compensation” in the form of adoption assistance is available depending on your state laws and regulations.

How Does Financial Support When Giving Baby Up for Adoption Work?

Adoption agencies and adoptive families understand that you’re going to need help during your pregnancy.  So, they provide adoption financial assistance during your pregnancy and adoption process.

The adoption compensation that you’ll receive is referred to as your living expenses. Your living expenses can help cover your:

  • Rent
  • Utilities
  • Groceries
  • Cell phone and data plan
  • Transportation costs
  • And more

If you’re asking about “giving-baby-up-for-adoption” money and adoption “compensation” for birth mothers, we hope that this helps to answer some difficult questions for you, such as “Does a mother of a baby get paid for adoption?” “Do adoption agencies pay birth mothers?” and “Do you get money for adopting your child out?”

Your adoption specialist will also be more than happy to explain your living expenses in depth as they learn more about your financial needs. Your adoption‐related services and medical expenses will always be taken care of by the adoption professional and the adoptive family that you choose.

How Much Financial Assistance for Adoption Do You Receive?

The amount of compensation for “giving a baby up” for adoption that you’ll receive really depends on the state you live in and how much the court allows for your adoption.

One of the first things that your adoption specialist will ask you to fill out is a list outlining your financial needs in an adoption. You can write out your monthly budget and include any additional financial obligations that you need help with.

The amount of money to “give baby up” for adoption that you’ll receive will also depend on your living situation and how far along in your pregnancy you are. Adoption agencies understand that your job and your living situation have the potential to change over the course of your pregnancy. For example, you may have a tight budget during your pregnancy because you’re forced to work less hours, or because you don’t have as much support and security from your family, friends, and significant other.  All of these things will increase your need for financial assistance for adoption.

In some instances, you may be able to receive financial help for birth mothers giving baby up for adoption up to four to six weeks after your pregnancy. What financial assistance you receive will always be determined by your adoption professional.

When Does the Birth Mother “Get Paid” to Do Adoption?

This will depend on how quickly your adoption specialist receives your living expenses form. Once you have filled out the form to the best of your abilities, your specialist will work as quickly as possible to get you the maximum amount of financial assistance for adoption that you’re eligible to receive. You can expect to start receiving your adoption financial assistance soon after you complete this step with your adoption professional.

Hopefully, this article helped answer some of the questions you have such as, “Do you get paid to “give your baby” up for adoption?” For additional help and resources, here are some great adoption agencies that you can contact about adoption financial assistance: